Twitter Expands its Fact-Checking Project Birdwatch

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Twitter Expands its Fact-Checking Project Birdwatch

Last year, the famous social networking platform started an initiative called Birdwatch, in which users were invited to report deceptive tweets and provide comments in order to expose such content, which would then be appended to the original tweet.

Twitter, like other social media platforms, has long been pressed to do more to prevent the spread of incorrect and misleading information among its 217 million daily users.

In addition, the notes written by the 10,000 participants in the Birdwatch pilot programme were archived on a separate website. Random users on the site in the United States will now be able to see Birdwatch notes directly via tweets and score the information’s usefulness.

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The business also stated that the Birdwatch initiative will be expanded to other countries. On Thursday, numerous Birdwatch notes addressed inaccurate information about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine last week.

An photograph of British rockstar Paul McCartney waving a Ukrainian flag while on stage in front of a crowd was featured in a tweet on February 26th that has been retweeted over 17,000 times.

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The photo was taken in 2008 during McCartney’s performance at a “Independence Concert” in Kyiv, according to a message attached to the tweet on the Birdwatch site.

People were 20% to 40% less likely to agree with the content of a potentially false tweet after reading a Birdwatch note about it, according to the business, than those who saw the content without the note.

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